Sound is a type of energy made by vibrations. When an object vibrates, it causes tiny air particles to move.

Imagine you are sitting in a quiet room with a friend. If you clap your hands, the shock causes the air around your hands to begin vibrating.

When air particles vibrate, they bump into other particles near them. Then these particles begin to vibrate and bump into even more air particles. When the air particles begin vibrating the air inside your ear, you hear a sound.

This chain reaction continues until the particles run out of energy. This is what we call a “sound wave.”

So what happens when you turn the volume up on your stereo or television? Well, you’re not only turning up the volume, you’re actually turning up the amplitude!

Volume is the intensity of a sound wave. It is directly related to amplitude, which is the height of a sound wave.

Imagine a drawing of ocean waves. The highest part of the wave is the crest. The dips in-between each wave are called “troughs.”

The distance from the highest part of the crest to the lowest part of the trough is amplitude. Sound waves and ocean waves may be made of different things, but they work the same way. Changing the amplitude of a sound wave changes its loudness or intensity.

If you are playing a guitar, the vibrations of the strings force nearby air molecules to compress and expand. The volume of your guitar playing depends on how hard or softly you pluck the strings.

When you pluck a string gently, the sound will be softer because you have transferred less energy to the string. By using less energy, the string does not vibrate as much and will move less air than if you had plucked the same string forcefully.

On the other hand, if you pluck the same string with a lot of force, the note will be much louder. When you use more force to pluck the string, you are using more energy.

This extra energy causes the string to vibrate more, which helps it move more air particles for a longer time. A string plucked with force has greater amplitude, and greater amplitude makes the sound louder when it reaches your ear.

Volume depends on amplitude. Greater amplitude produces louder sounds. Look at the following pairs and decide which item has greater amplitude:

  • yell or whisper
  • siren or cat meow
  • mosquito buzz or car alarm
  • fireworks or violin

Colorado University recently studied a small group of iPod users. The researchers found that some of the young people had their music cranked up loud enough to cause long-term hearing damage and didn’t even realize it.

Many young people assume the maximum volume on an iPod is safe, but in some instances, listening to an MP3 player at maximum volume is just as loud as a chainsaw or rock concert. Over time, loud noises can damage fragile hair cells in the inner ear.

These hairs are responsible for receiving sound waves and sending sound information to the brain. Over time, repeated exposure to loud sounds, including music, can permanently damage these delicate hair cells and lead to permanent hearing loss.

Lowering the volume and limiting the amount of time spent listening to music on headphones is the best way to protect your hearing.

 

94 Join the Discussion

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  1. I LOVE the video! That’s defiantly one thing to do if your bored! :)
    Is it hard to find videos to match what you guys are writing about? I would think it would be! :)
    And guess what? Tomorrow is national “pie” day. (In math terms!) Our class is having a competition to see how far out we can go in reciting pi! :)

    • Hi, Abby! We try to pick videos that best match each Wonder and help make learning extra fun! We’re glad you like this one! :-)

    • We’re glad you were WONDERing about that, gdog!

      We did a little investigating, and found out it’s a groovy ginger flavored soda called “Ale-8-One.” It’s been around a long time! Here’s a link if you want to learn a little more about it: http://ale8one.com/history

  2. I think the video is really cool it really captures what the article is about. Also the article really reminds me of our sound unit in science when we were studying different types of energy!

    • It’s pretty cool to hear all those sounds put together like that, isn’t it, Muna Abdi? Thanks so much for being a friend of Wonderopolis and for your awesome comment! :-)

    • You bet, Muna Abdi! We hope you’ll keep visiting Wonderopolis and letting us know what you’re WONDERing about! :-)

    • Hi there, Muna! We search all over the internet to find the best video to go with each Wonder of the Day. This one was pretty cool, wasn’t it? The person who made this video posted it to the website we found it on back in October of 2010. We can’t say for sure when the video was made, but that’s when it first got posted online.

      Thanks so much for commenting today! You’re a GREAT Wonder Friend! :-)

  3. Hello Wonderopolis! This is Sara from Mrs. Caplin’s class.
    It was really obvious why Mrs. Caplin assigned us this wonder because we are studying sound energy in science. Just yesterday we learned about how sound travels in waves and it’s intensity is measured in volume. But even though we are studying sound, this wonder still gave me some interesting facts!
    I had no idea what amplitude was before reading this wonder because we haven’t learned about that yet, and I had no idea that turning up the volume so high on iPods could cause ear damage, I always assumed that they were made safe. Now I understand why my parents tell me not to put the music up so high and bought me ear buds with a volume limitation.
    The video was very interesting. I liked how the two boys used everyday objects and utensils to make a unique video that could really intrigue you with the qualities of sound.
    When you said that high sound can damage our ear hair cells I wondered, is that how you become deaf? Do deaf people not have these hair cells which causes them to be deaf?
    Thanks for the wonderful wonder! Bye!

    • What a great comment, Sara! Thank you for sharing your background knowledge about sound energy…we think Mrs. Caplin is really awesome for introducing you guys to this Wonder when you are studying about the subject in school! We’re pretty sure there are many reasons why people are deaf or can become deaf. We think the damaging of hair cells in just one of the causes of hearing loss. Thanks for visiting this Wonder of the Day®! :-)

  4. Hi, this is Haley from Mrs. Caplin’s class. This was an extraordinary wonder. I thought the video was excellent! It’s also a very good visual of what sound is. I learned many new facts including the meaning of the word amplitude which is the height of a sound wave, that volume depends on amplitude, and that volume is the intensity of a sound wave. I especially like this wonder because my class is currently doing this in science class. We haven’t learned about amplitude yet, but I think we will, and I’ll be an expert on it! This was an outstanding wonder! I learned several new facts so thanks!

    • We really liked the words you used to describe this Wonder, Haley! Extraordinary! Excellent! Outstanding! We also think it’s super cool that you and your “MC” classmates are studying sound and that you know a little bit more about it after exploring this Wonder! :-)

  5. Hi! I’m Jack Proctor from Mrs. Caplin’s class. I’ve learned a lot from this wonder! I think it is cool that we’re learning about sound energy in science right now. Recently we learned that sound travels in waves and I think that you compared volume and amplitude to ocean waves.
    Amplitude is a new vocabulary word for me. Now I know that amplitude is the height of a sound wave. I also think that it is amazing that volume can be used in so many different ways! In math we are learning about surface area and volume and how to find it.
    I didn’t know that if you turn your iPod volume on too high that you can cause long-term hearing damage to your ears. I think that it’s crazy that some people were doing that and they didn’t even realize it!
    In science class a few days ago, we watched a video that showed how sound waves go into your ears. It showed a close up of an ear and I could see the hairs that receive the sound waves. Speaking of videos, I thought that your video was fascinating! I think that it is cool, too, that teenagers can put all of that sound together and make an extremely amazing video!
    Thanks so much for the phenomenal wonder!

    • We’re so proud of you for learning a new vocabulary word (amplitude), Jack! That video you got to watch in science class sounds really neat, too! It’s true that lots of people don’t understand the damage they can do to their hearing by playing their digital music devices too loudly. Thank you for such a PHENOMENAL comment! :-)

  6. Hello, I’m James from Mrs. Caplin’s class. I knew about volume but I never knew the exact meaning of amplitude. I thought that it was so interesting how the crest and the troughs are pretty much opposites. In science we’re learning about sound too and what sound does. We’ve learned that you can blow out a candle using a container with a hole in its lid because of sound waves. I think that tomorrows wonder of the day would be about the area of a circle because the formula is pi times radius squared, which I learned in math class a while ago.

    • We have to tell you, James, you and your “MC” classmates are SUPER awesome for writing all the smart comments you are sending us tonight! We really enjoy hearing how you are connecting what you learn in school with what you learn in Wonderopolis! That ROCKS! :-)

  7. Hi, I’m Mukund from Mrs. Caplin’s class. I learned that amplitude is the height of a sound wave. I also learned that you never actually turn up the volume, you turn up the amplitude. This is a perfect wonder because we are doing sound energy in science. In science we’re doing an experiment in which you tie two pieces of string to a metal spoon. Then you wrap the other side of the string to your finger. Next you put the string to your ear. After that your partner hits the metal spoon with another metal spoon. You’re supposed to do this experiment with a string being 75 cm, 50 cm, and 25 cm. The sound we heard was amazing. I think you should try this experiment. I learned that the more energy that travels to an instrument the louder the note will be. I predict that tomorrow’s wonder will be about the formula for finding the area of a circle. The formula for finding the area of a circle is pi(r)squared. The clue for tomorrow’s wonder is exactly what we did in math class. In math when we learned about the area of a circle by eating square pies. I really liked this wonder.

    • WOW! That experiment SOUNDS really cool, Mukund! We will definitely have to give it a try! Thank you for sharing it with your friends in Wonderopolis and also for sharing all the awesome things you learned about sound by visiting this Wonder of the Day®! :-)

  8. This was a superb WONDER Of The Day!! This WONDER connects to our science learning in school because we are working on sound energy and the transfer of it. I thought that the video was very unique because the creators don’t use any real instruments in the whole video, but they still made cool music. I learned that when air particles vibrate, they bump into other particles near them. Then, those particles begin to vibrate and bump into even more air particles. When the air particles begin vibrating the air inside your ear you can hear a sound. I didn’t know that this chain reaction continued until the air particles run out of energy and we call this a sound wave. I visualized drawing the ocean waves and it helped me understand crest and troughs and that helped me understand amplitude. I also learned that changing the amplitude of a sound changes the intensity. I haven’t ever played a guitar, but I understand the concept of sound energy and the transfer of it because last night our science homework was to read in our textbook about sound energy and the transfer with instruments.

    • Thanks for letting us know all the AMAZING things you know about sound, sound waves and amplitude, Olivia! You know a LOT! We appreciate your comment and how you connected this Wonder of the Day® to what you are learning at school! :-)

  9. Wow, I learned a bunch from this wonder that I didn’t know, like Volume is the intensity of sound energy. In school, we’re also learning about sound energy. I also didn’t know that an I-pod is a safe loudness in sound but when it comes turning your MP3 player up all the way, that is as bad as listening to a chainsaw or going to a rock concert. When I read the word amplitude “height of a sound wave”, I did not know what it meant, but now that I know what it means, I am thinking of using it in my science work. Is tomorrows wonder about Pi?

  10. Hey, wonderopolis. Don’t you guys just love science? In my class, we’re learning about sound energy. In my class, we did an experiment where we tied a string to a spoon and wrapped it around our fingers and then we put our fingers into our ears and then hit the spoon with another spoon to get a vibration. I didn’t know that amplitude as the height of a sound wave. I also think that tomorrow’s wonder is about the formula of area with pi. Thanks for the info, bye.

    • YES, Wyatt! We love science and we’re glad you do, too! You and your “MC” classmates sure are lucky to have a teacher like Mrs. Caplin who shares extra fun ways to learn (like Wonderopolis and cool experiments) with you! Thanks for leaving us this GREAT comment! :-)

  11. Hi, my name is Jack Triplett from Mrs.Caplin’s class. I thought this wonder was amazing! I like it so much because it tells many facts that I haven’t ever learned. I was also amazed because in science, my class had an experiment today where we took a spoon, and then tied a not of string on one end of it and the same on the other side. Then we measured it and the first try had to be 75 centimeters long and then we did a second try and it had to be 50 centimeters long. After that, we made it 25 centimeters long and each time we heard a different noise when we tapped a spoon to the spoon that we hit. Then we had to write our observations down on a piece of paper. I can’t believe how fun it was. I learned that amplitude is the height of one sound wave. I think it’s cool how all the different ways volume is used. I loved learning about this wonder. I’ll be sure to comment later!

    • This is a SUPER comment, Jack! Thanks for sharing that sound experiment with everyone in Wonderopolis today! We think it’s really awesome how this Wonder relates to what you and your “MC” classmates are learning in Mrs. Caplin’s class! :-)

  12. Hi, I’m Alex from Mrs.Caplin’s class. This was a great wonder (considering the fact that we are learning about sound energy in science). I learned more about the vibrations and how your ear takes in the sounds. I also didn’t know about the hairs inside your ear. I also didn’t know that when you’re playing the guitar, the pick strumming on the string creates vibration. When I pluck my violin I guess that’s the same concept. I don’t get how the hair in your ear can get damaged. I mean wouldn’t something pop in your ear instead of hair getting damaged? Thanks for the awesome wonder!!!!

  13. Hi! I’m Sarah from MC (Mrs.Caplin’s Class). I never knew what amplitude was until I read this wonder. Now I know amplitude means the height of the sound wave. It’s extremely interesting to know that the sound wave is just like visualizing an ocean wave. The highest location of the wave is called a crest. The dips in-between each wave are called “troughs.”

    I also didn’t know that hair cells are so delicate. Now I understand why my parents told me when I was little to turn down the volume of TV and other music players.
    This week, our class just learned about sound energy. We also did a sound energy experiment today. I tied two certain equal length strings onto a metal spoon, then wrapped the free ends of the strings to each of my index fingers. Then I plugged my ears with my index fingers. After that, my partner used a different metal spoon and lightly tapped against my spoon. However, in my ears, it sounds like a gong being hit. I wonder why this happened?
    Thanks for this phenomenal wonder!

    • We have really enjoyed reading all these great “MC” comments tonight and learning about all the cool SOUND lessons and experiments you and your classmates are learning from, Sarah! Your comment ROCKS! :-)

  14. I thought this wonder was really cool! The video was very funny. It was cool to know that all of those things can make sounds and that everything has different sounds. We’re learning about sound energy in science and it was really cool to know a little bit more about it. I already knew that sound was made by vibration, but I didn’t know that a continuous chain of a sound is called a sound wave! I’ve heard that word a lot, but I just haven’t thought about it. Another thing I learned that I didn’t know from science is that volume and amplitude are very related, but the amplitude is actually the height of a sound wave. That’s really cool! Great wonder but I have one more question. What makes the loudest sound on earth? Well, continue to make your amazing wonders! I’ll be on this website a lot more now!

  15. Hi, I am Harshitha from Mrs. Caplin’s class.
    Wow, that was the most awesome wonder I’ve ever seen. We’re learning about SOUND in our science class! I’d learned many facts. The facts are: Sound is a type of energy made by vibrations. When an object vibrates, it causes tiny air particles to move. When air particles vibrate, they bump into other particles near them. Then these particles begin to vibrate and bump into even more air particles. When the air particles begin vibrating the air inside your ear, you hear a sound. This chain reaction continues until the particles run out of energy. This is what you call a “sound wave.” Volume is the intensity of a sound wave. It is directly related to amplitude, which is the height of a sound wave. Volume, Vibration, Particles, Reaction, I heard these words in my science class. I heard my Mom say that “Particles are also called Molecules.’ Is that true? Today in Science class we did a SPOON EXPERIMENT. Then we wound the string into our index finger. We need to tie the string to the spoon and measure the string and see if it’s 75cm long. Then we wound the string into our index finger. And we need to put it in our ears. The sound was extremely awesome. It was like a ringing bell in a church. You should try it. Anyways, thanks for the information. (It’s very helpful!)

    • WOW! You learned so many awesome things about sound between your class studies and this Wonder of the Day®, Harshitha! We’re super proud of you! Thank you for sharing your comment with us! :-)

  16. Rock on MC students-I’m extremely impressed with your STRONG comments and especially how you are connecting our lab work in school today to this wonder. I’ve also noticed that many of you are using more than 3 contractions in your comments. I’m wondering how tomorrow will go when some of the MC students become the teacher of the “spoon experiment?” I’m very excited!!

    • We’re in awe of how AWESOME and WONDERful your students’ comments have been tonight, Mrs. Caplin! We have really enjoyed hearing all the things they have learned about sound by exploring this Wonder and all the background knowledge they had before they explored it (thanks to the great experiments and lessons in your class!)! :-)

  17. Hi, I’m Samia from Mrs. Caplin’s class. Before this wonder I didn’t know volume depends on amplitude. Greater amplitude produces louder sounds. I also didn’t know amplitude is the height of a sound wave. I was wondering…is there a sound so loud humans can’t hear it? If there is, that would be really cool.

    In class, we are learning about sound. Yesterday, we did an experiment to find out if you can blow out a candle using sound. We figured out that if you cut a hole in a small container and tap the top on top of the candle the sound waves will blow out the candle. It was really cool.

    I really enjoyed this wonder’s video and it was cool how they used household objects to make music. My grade level did something similar to that. We had a 5th grade music program and there was a group of kids from my class that went up on stage and did a song using household objects our music teacher brought in. One kid even did a drum solo with a few cans and bottles.

    I really enjoyed this wonder.

    • Thanks so much for sharing your personal connection to the video for this Wonder, Samia! We think it’s really cool to know that so many different, interesting sounds can be made from objects we find around the house! :-)

  18. Cool! I had no idea what “amplitude” meant! I just quizzed my dad on it and he knew that it was the height of a sound wave! Now we both know! :) I already had background knowledge about sound waves, but I still learned a lot! Now I’m ready for 6th grade sound science. How loud does a sound have to be to break a glass? I also didn’t know about “troughs” being the dip-ins between sound waves. Go, Wonderopolis! :)

  19. Wow! I’m really impressed with this wonder! The video was phenomenal. I learned that amplitude is the height of the sound wave! We’re learning about Sound Energy in Science this month and I’ll use this wonder to help me understand sounds and connect to it. I never knew that the hair cells are fragile. I already knew that the higher the volume or force, the louder the sound and that moving particles create sound waves when vibrating. I learned the last question in this wonder tonight.

    Today we did a very cool experiment where you tied 2 strings to a spoon and wrapped the other ends of the strings on your finger and put it in your ear. When your partner hit the spoon with another one the results rocked! I’m now wondering do you know any other fun experiments for sound energy? Thanks for a great wonder!

  20. Dear Wonderopolis this wonder was phenomenal. When my teacher said “Your wonder homework today is What Makes Sounds Louder?” I new exactly why she picked it. Mrs.Caplin picked this wonder of the day because we started learning sound energy yesterday. The video was unique because I liked it when the boys used all different kind of materials to make sound and none of them were real instruments. When I was reading the incredible wonder I found the word “exposure.” In word study we’re learning about Greek and Latin bases. Last week we were focusing on pos and posit in words. I didn’t think about sound waves and ocean waves may be made of different things, but they work the same way. So I thought that was really cool. When first I was reading this wonder, I never new what the word amplitude was, but now I know amplitude means the height of the sound wave.
    I also learned more facts about sound and how it works, but I’ve got to go now. Thanks for the kindness of making this wonder so people can learn about sound energy like me.
    ~Betty MC~

    • Thank YOU for leaving us such a super great comment, Betty! We sure do appreciate it! We think it’s AWESOME that you used your background knowledge of Greek and Latin base words to help you with words you found in this Wonder! We’re proud of you! :-)

  21. Hi, I’m Eric from Mrs. Caplin’s class. I’ve learned that when you turn the volume up on a television, you’re actually turning the amplitude. We started to learn about sound energy yesterday in science class but we never learned about amplitude which means the height of a sound wave. I also learned that when air particles vibrate,they bump into other particles near them. Then these particles begin to vibrate and bump into even more air particles. When the air particles begin vibrating the air inside your ear, you hear a sound. Thank you for this phenomenal wonder. Also is tomorrow’s wonder about pi r squared?

    • WOW! You’ve learned a LOT about sound, Eric! We’re super proud of you! Thanks for leaving us this awesome comment to share your SOUND SMARTS! Yes, since this Wonder (#161) is a past Wonder of the Day® from back in March of 2011, we can tell you that Wonder of the Day® #162 IS about PI! Here is a link to that Wonder: http://wonderopolis.org/wonder/what-is-pi/. :-)

  22. What an excellent video- I especially liked it because it gave you a wonderful visual of what sound really is-considering the fact that in science in our class (Mrs. Caplin’s class, that is) we are learning about sound and sound energy-but we haven’t come across anything about the hairs in your ears-I never really thought there were tiny hair cells in my ear and that’s why I can hear. I found that very interesting and a little gross, but sometimes science is gross. I wonder if that is why when you push your ears down (tight enough so you can’t hear) the hair gets smushed so they don’t receive as many sound waves as they normally would when you’re not covering your ears. One time when I went to a concert there were so many people shouting and screaming that even when I covered my ears the sound waves still came through. I also never knew about the vocab word amplitude. We have never talked about it in science so it was very new to me when I figured out that volume depends on it. Tonight I can go up to my parents and act all sciencey and smart and say-”wow today is extraordinary loud, that must mean the amplitude is producing much more than normal. Fascinating.” They’d be so shocked and wouldn’t look at me like a fifth grader-instead a person that just got their college diploma. I’ll try to write back to you and tell you what happens with acting all sciencey and smart.
    I learned a lot-
    so thanks a lot!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Hi, Leah! It’s true, sometimes science is gross, but that can make it extra WONDERful! Thank you for this awesome comment…we can’t wait to hear what happens when you show your parents how much you know about SOUND! :-)

  23. I’m back!! A few minutes ago, I went up to my mom and told her “Tonight is extraordinarily loud- that must mean that the amplitude is producing much more than usual”. She stared at me for about ten seconds then said “Um, ok, that’s great, dear” with a confused look on her face, so she wasn’t shocked or thought I was a person with a collage diploma. Really I think she thought I was talking gibberish. I don’t think I’ll be talking sciencey and smart anymore.

    • Thanks for sharing what your mom said, Leah! We think you should keep talking the way you are and keep sharing all the awesome things you are learning in school and on Wonderopolis! We’re super proud of you!

      Did you know there is a Wonder of the Day® about GIBBERISH? It’s past Wonder #256 – What Is Gibberish? Here is a link that will take you right to it: http://wonderopolis.org/wonder/what-is-gibberish/. Happy WONDERing! :-)

  24. Hi Wonderopolis!$!$ I’ve just read your wonder and it is marvelous. My teacher, Mrs. Caplin, must have had my class and I write about this wonder because we’ve been learning about different types of energy, and this week was all about sound energy. I’ve enjoyed reading this wonder tremendously, and have learned some very important facts. One of my facts is that volume is the intensity of a sound wave. I also learned that vibrating particles make up the sound that we hear everyday. Something I noticed that was funny to me is that you’ve connected vibrations with musical instruments and in class we did the same thing! Thank you again for this wonderful wonder!!! *Jillian*

    • How COOL, Jillian! Thank you for sharing how you connected this Wonder about sound to what you are learning in class! We think that’s AWESOME! We appreciate the great words you used in your comment, too, like “marvelous” and “tremendously!” :-)

  25. Hi Wonderopolis! This is McKenna from Mrs. Caplin’s class. This WONDER was a great reinforcement of what we are learning in science class right now. Even though we learned some of these facts already, I’m still open to new learning. Some of the new facts I learned were what amplitude means and is. It isn’t the same thing as volume. Volume is the intensity of vibration, and amplitude is the height of a sound wave. I also learned that when you make a sound, it vibrates, and causes the air particles to move around. The last thing I learned was that over time, loud noises can damage the hair in your ears. Now I have just a few questions. What’s the instrument with the greatest amplitude? Does an amplifier relate to amplitude? Are people deaf because they were born without any hair cells in their ear? and why do people loose their hearing as they get older? Thank you for a phenomenal WONDER!!!! I learned many new and interesting facts.

    • We’re really happy to hear that you are open to new learning, McKenna! You asked a lot of WONDERful questions about sound, too! We’ll all have to do a bit more WONDERing about them! :-)

  26. Hi this is Srikar from Mrs. Caplin’s Class. The video was phenomenal. It was really cool how those two guys made music from ordinary things. We’re learning about Sound Energy in Science this month and it’s cool how Mrs. Caplin chose this wonder. I learned that amplitude is the height of the sound wave. I also didn’t know that hair cells are so delicate. I visualized drawing the ocean waves and it helped me understand crest and troughs and that helped me understand amplitude. Is there a sound so loud humans can’t hear it?

    • Hi, Srikar! We’re not sure if there is a sound that loud, but it’s fun to WONDER if there might be! Thank you for sharing all the awesome things you learned about SOUND in school and by exploring this Wonder! :-)

    • Thanks for leaving us an AWESOME comment to let us know you liked this Wonder of the Day®, Janae! We really appreciate hearing that! Have a WONDERful day! :-)

    • Thanks for letting us know you enjoyed exploring this Wonder, Julie! To make the smiley faces, you put a colon, a small dash and an ending parenthesis together without any spaces. So, : + – + ) = :-) !

    • How cool, Wonder Friend Naya! We appreciate your comment and your enthusiasm! It’s so much fun to Wonder with great friends like you! :)

    • You are certainly right, maxk358. You have to be careful about turning up the sound too loud. Thanks for WONDERing with us Wonder Friend! :-)

  27. WOW!! Really cool video you guys! I loved the beat. I play an electric guitar. So, I should know that when you pluck a string hard you’ll get more energy. And when you pluck the string softly your using less energy.

  28. That video was cool with epic sounds. I loved hearing the sounds. I am learning about sound in class. I learned that sound can hurt your ears pretty bad. I think the next wonder will be about fractions.
    P.S. I like videos like that!!!

  29. I loved this video, and I am learning about sound in school and vibrations. But I never knew that sound is a type of energy made by vibration! Thanks!!!!!!

  30. Hi, I loved the video. I didn’t know that that when sound is really loud it can damage hair cells in the inner ear. I can’t wait to see more wonders.

    • What a WONDERful fact from the Wonder, Andrewd1649! We are so glad that you learned something new. Thanks for WONDERing with us! :-)

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Have you ever wondered…

  • What makes sounds louder?
  • What is a sound wave?
  • What is amplitude?

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