Since 1990, each November has been set aside as Native American Heritage Month. During this month, people all over the United States celebrate and recognize the major contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the country.

Much of what we know about the history of America comes from events recorded by European colonists who first came to America in the early 17th century. However, Native Americans — the indigenous (native) peoples of North America — lived in these lands for thousands of years before that.

Experts believe the first Native Americans came from Asia. Thousands of years ago, what is now Siberia in Russia was connected to what is now Alaska in the U.S. by a land bridge. This area across the Bering Sea was called Beringia.

People were able to cross Beringia into what is now Alaska. Over thousands of years, many different and distinct tribes and ethnic groups crossed over into this new territory and began to spread across all of what is now North America. Many of these tribes still exist today.

These early Native Americans lived mainly off the land, relying upon hunting and gathering of wild plants and animals. They occupied land for use by the entire community. This is very different from the European colonists’ concept of ownership or individual property rights.

After the arrival of European colonists, Native Americans suffered many deaths due to diseases brought from overseas. There was also increasing conflict with the colonists who wanted to “civilize” them and teach them unfamiliar farming methods.

After the Civil War, westward expansion brought western Native American tribes into greater conflicts that resulted in a series of “Indian wars.” Over time, many tribes were forced to give up their lands as a result of treaties to end these wars. Many of these tribes were given new or different lands to establish as reservations to live on.

Today, there are approximately two million Native Americans living in the U.S. and about one million in Canada (where they’re called “First Nations” instead of Native Americans). These nearly three million Native Americans in the U.S. and Canada speak over 150 different Native American languages.

At times, the terms used to refer to Native Americans have been controversial. According to U.S. Census Bureau statistics, though, it appears that most Native Americans prefer to call themselves American Indians or simply Indians.

The Native Americans in the U.S. can be divided into over 560 separate tribes. Even though they’re all considered Native Americans, their languages, clothing, customs and cultures can vary greatly from one tribe to another.

These diverse tribal cultures celebrate their unique identities and contributions in many ways. Through independent newspapers, community schools, tribal councils, native colleges, museums, arts and crafts programs and language preservation, the modern descendants of these many tribes continue to survive and thrive in the modern society they helped to build.

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    • Thanks so much for sharing the awesome facts you learned by visiting today’s Wonder, Austin! We’re so happy you left us a comment and we hope you have a WONDERful day! :-)

  1. I’m 1/4 Native American and your article was so cool that you should make a book of wonders and put it in stores for people to buy.

    • Thanks for sharing your personal connection to this Wonder about Native Americans, David! We appreciate your idea about a book of Wonders, too! What a GREAT Wonder Friend you are! :-)

    • It’s very interesting that 3 MILLION people in Canada AND the United States speak Native American languages. I’m Apache and I’m 1/6 Native American. I just learned this from my dad’s side but it’s very interesting to learn about my culture. I prefer living with my family besides I made my own home-made bow made out of string and a metal hanger!!! So if I did that, I feel Native American.

      • Hey Xander! Thanks for the comment! That is a very interesting fact – plus that there are more than 150 Native American languages! Can you believe it? We WONDER how hard it would be to learn one of those languages! What do you think? We are glad you are learning more about your family history too! :)

  2. Cool, I really liked this wonder. It was really fun to see what all these fun words mean. I am totally addicted to Wonderopolis, it is really, really cool! Everyone says I am addicted to Wonderopolis, and it’s so true! I LOVE WONDEROPOLIS!!!!! (:

    I think tomorrow’s wonder is about jellyfish! :)

    • We’re super happy to have you as a Wonder Friend, Missy! We can tell you LOVE to learn, and we’re sure glad you love learning in Wonderopolis! Thank you for sharing that you liked all the Native American words for animals and other things found in nature. We learned a lot from exploring today’s Wonder, too! :-)

  3. What a great wonder! We have some books in our classroom that are about Native Americans that we are going to check out. :) We also shared in our WONDER notebooks some of the characteristics our tribes would have. We shared that our tribes would be made up of our friends and family. Thanks for sparking such great conversations.

    • All that extra WONDERing is making us super happy, Kerrick Elementary School! We’re so glad you had some great conversations after exploring this Wonder, and think it’s GREAT that you shared about Native Americans in your Wonder Notebooks! Way to go! :-)

  4. Native Americans can speak more than 150 different Native American languages???? That’s interesting…but it is no where close to the number of languages spoken in Papua, New Guinea—around 850. :)

    • That’s a LOT of languages, Elango! Thank you so much for visiting Wonderopolis and for teaching US something new today! :-)

    • Thanks for letting us know you liked the video for this Wonder, Natalia! We thought the hoop dancer was very talented and we really liked hearing his story! It must have taken him a long time to perfect his skill with hoop dancing! We think it is AWESOME that he is teaching younger members of his tribe the traditions that go with this sacred dance, too, don’t you? :-)

    • Thanks for leaving us such an AWESOME comment today, Sam! You can stop by Wonderopolis any time you like! We love learning, too! :-)

  5. First of all, I’m not a Boy!!!!!!! I thought this was very interesting. It reminds me of my Native American project in my advanced learning class. It taught me some things. It was very interesting.

    • We’re super happy to hear that you learned some things by exploring this Wonder about Native Americans, Alex! Thank you for sharing your personal connection to it, too! :-)

  6. I enjoy learning about the heritage of the Native Americans. They have a very beautiful culture and traditions. I would love to spend a day in their shoes! Thank you, Wonderopolis, for letting us learn about the Native American culture. You are AWESOME!

    • We think your comment is AWESOME, Gabriella! Thank you for visiting Wonderopolis today and for letting us know that you enjoyed this Wonder of the Day®! Yes, Native American culture and traditions are very beautiful and very meaningful. We’re glad you shared your thoughts with us today! :-)

    • We’re super glad you like this Wonder of the Day®, Wonder Person! Thanks so much for visiting Wonderopolis and for leaving us this GREAT comment! :-)

  7. Wow! I had no idea that there were more than 560 Indian tribes! I also didn’t know that the tribes are 2,000 years old! That’s incredible! I wonder what food they would eat at celebrations 2,000 years ago? Go, Wonderopolis!

    • That’s a GREAT question, Ryan! We think it’s AWESOME that you WONDERed even more about this Wonder after you explored it! Thank you for sharing what you learned and what you still hope to learn about Native Americans! :-)

  8. Hi, this is Samia from Mrs. Caplin’s class.
    Today I learned from this wonder that ever since 1990, each November has been set aside as Native American Heritage Month. I thought that is really cool. I also learned that early Native Americans lived mainly off of the land, relying on hunting animals and gathering wild plants. I also thought the video was really cool. Some of the new words I learned were: contribution, ethnic, and statistics. I have heard those words before, but never really thought about their meaning. In all, I really liked this wonder.

    • WOW! You really learned a LOT from visiting this Wonder of the Day®, Samia! It makes us REALLY happy to hear that! Thank you for sharing the new words you learned about, too! :-)

  9. Wow, I never knew that there were more than 560 different Native American tribes. When I was reading, I saw the word “indigenous” and remembered that we had seen that word in our Scholastic News article about the language of the Cherokee. I wondered if you would know what tribe had the largest population in the 1600s and which one has the largest population now? Also, I think I know but what happened to Beringia. Last year in fourth grade, I was assigned to do a Powerpoint on the Adena tribe, and I found that they lived in mounds, which was very different from the houses we live in now. Lastly, I thought that this was an amazing wonder!!!

    • We think it’s AWESOME that you have some AMAZING personal connections to this Wonder about Native Americans, James! Thank you for sharing about your Powerpoint presentation and all the cool things you learned by exploring this Wonder. You’re a GREAT Wonder Friend! :-)

  10. This article was so cool, because it connected to our fourth grade social studies lesson on Native Americans. We learned about the Beringia that connected Alaska to Asia, but I didn’t know that there is a total of about three million Native Americans in Canada and the USA. This was so surprising, especially that within those three million Native Americans, they speak about one hundred fifty languages! That is a lot of languages for only three million people! This was a great article, and I had a phenomenal time reading it!

    • What a GREAT comment, Jack! Thank you so much for letting us know that even though you already knew some things about Native Americans from your fourth grade studies, you still learned some new things from exploring this Wonder! We think you’re right, too! 150 really IS a lot of languages for only three million people! :-)

  11. Hi, my name is Mukund from Mrs. Caplin’s class. I didn’t know that there were 560 separate tribes in the United States. How many Native American tribes are there on the whole Earth? I learned that most Native Americans prefer to be called American Indians or simply Indians. I also learned that European colonists caused many Native Americans to suffer many deaths as a result of the diseases that were brought by the European colonists. I learned that the European colonists first came to America in the early 17th century. I really liked this wonder.

    • It makes us really happy to hear that you learned so many cool new facts by exploring this Wonder about Native Americans, Mukund! There are tribes of indigenous people all over the world, but they are native to their own countries and lands, not just America. We think it would be fun to know how many indigenous people there are in the whole world, too! Thanks for WONDERing about that! :-)

  12. I thought this wonder was very interesting. I learned a lot from it, like I did not know that there was such thing as Native American Heritage Month. I also did not know that there are about 2 million Native Americans living in the U.S. and about 1 million in Canada. I thought it was interesting that over thousands of years, the Indian tribes keep dying out. I did not know all of the tribe names like the Navajo, Lakota Sioux and Blackfoot. There are more than 560 separate tribes in the U.S. How many tribes still live in the U.S. today?

    • Thanks for leaving us this great comment, Matthew! We’re glad you discovered Native American Heritage Month by visiting this Wonder! Even though there are more than 560 separate tribes in the U.S., their customs, clothing and languages can be very different from each other! :-)

  13. Dear Wonderopolis,
    In my class, we are just starting a Native American topic. Today, our class highlighted the words that we didn’t know the meaning of from the “wonder words to know and use” (our teacher printed this wonder out). Then we used context clues to figure out the meaning.

    I never knew that Native Americans prefer to be called American Indians or just Indians.

    • We LOVE hearing about Wonder Friends using the context clues they find in different Wonders of the Day, Sarah! We know that “MC” students do that quite a bit, and that is super exciting to hear! Thank you for sharing this comment with us today! :-)

  14. Hey Wonderopolis, it’s McKenna from Mrs. Caplin’s class. This wonder was very intriguing to me. Going into this wonder, I had already known some background knowledge. I knew that the word indigenous meant native, and some of the Native American tribes in the United States and around the world, such as the Cherokee. I learned a ton of new interesting facts. For instance, that 3 million Native Americans stretch from the United States to Canada. I also learned that Native Americans are thought to have come from Asia. The last thing I learned is that many of the indigenous tribes that were able to cross Beringia, still exist today. Now, I was just wondering a few things. Do many Native Americans still exist in Asia? Also, how many indigenous languages are spoken throughout the United States and Canada? Lastly, how many tribes are in each of the fifty states in the U.S. or in the different provinces in Canada?

    • We think those are some REALLY awesome questions, McKenna! We’ll have to do some more WONDERing ourselves to learn the answers! We really appreciate you sharing that you already had background knowledge before you explored this Wonder. We also think it’s great that you learned so many new things, too! :-)

  15. I thought that this wonder was very intriguing. I thought that the video was amazing, and I learned that Native Americans dance to show their appreciation and their gratitude. From the article, I learned that November is Native American Heritage Month. I also didn’t know that there are about 1 million Native Americans in Canada and about 2 million in the USA. We did an activity in school where we highlighted words in the “Wonder words to know and use” that we didn’t know, and then we went through the article and we tried to figure out the meaning. I think that this was a great wonder of the day.

    • Thanks so much for sharing the learning activities you and your MC classmates had fun with today, Olivia! We’re glad you visited this Wonder together! :-)

  16. Hi, this is Haley from Mrs. Caplin’s class!! This wonder is really interesting! I learned that there is 560 separate tribes. I can connect to this wonder because we are learning about Native Americans in social studies at school. In class, we used context clues to figure out the words in the vocabulary box that we did not know the meaning to. Finally, do you know how many tribes are in Ohio today? This was a phenomenal wonder!

    • Hi, Haley! That is a GREAT question! We did some WONDERing, and found a website that lists all the Native American tribes in the U.S. by state. You can search for Ohio tribes and tribes from all the other states by visiting here: http://www.ncsl.org/?tabid=13278. Thanks so much for leaving us this comment today! :-)

  17. Hi, Wonderopolis! This is Lynn from Mrs. Caplin’s class. I thought that this wonder was very interesting. I never knew that there are 560 Indian tribes and that there is a Native American Heritage Month. I am wondering how many Indians use wampag as shelter in North America? How many tribes are located in Canada? I thought that the video was very neat and our class is learning about Indians in school, which made me connect to this wonder! I have learned many great things from this wonder and am so interested to learn more!

    • We are super excited to hear that you want to learn even MORE about Native Americans after exploring this Wonder, Lynn! We also think it is awesome that your class is studying about Native Americans in social studies, and that you were able to make that personal connection! Thanks so much for being a great Wonder Friend! :-)

  18. Hi, I am Harshitha from Mrs. Caplin’s class. Today we started learning about Native Americans. Mrs.Caplin showed us this cool wonder which connected to our social studies.
    I learned many new words, like contribution, reservation, heritage, tribe and ethnic. I know some of Indian culture, but I don’t know more.
    I am going to learn more from this lesson about Native Americans. I was really surprised because there are 2 million Native Americans. I learned that Native Americans migrated from Asia to North America and from North America to South America’s southern tip. I learned Native Americans traveled on the Ice age bridge in the Bering sea. I wonder how many Native American were in the whole world. Thanks for the information, and I will learn more.

    • We really like hearing about all this super LEARNING that you and your MC classmates are doing, Harshitha! It’s fun to learn new things every day, isn’t it? Thank you for sharing all the awesome things you found out by exploring this Wonder of the Day® about Native Americans! :-)

  19. Wow! I never knew that there were about two million native Americans living in the United states right now on November 30, 2011. That’s very interesting to wonder and think about. I also didn’t know that about three million Native Americans in Canada and the United States speak more than 150 Native American languages! My wonderful teacher, Mrs. Caplin, had a huge assignment just on this wonder, where we had to find all the vocab words that we didn’t know and figure out what they meant using context clues around the word. So, I already read this wonder a bunch at school, but it’s always good to read it over as many times as you can. So, I had some background knowledge with all the vocab words because I already knew what they meant. I think it’s ssoo cool how in your wonder, it talks about how the first Native Americans came from Asia using the land bridge. Well, just today, we talked about the Siberian Indians in Social Studies, so while I was reading that part, I could connect it to Social Studies. This wonder interested me in so many ways, but I was just wondering do you know how many tribes there actually are? Also, do you know how many Native Americans live in Asia, or if they still do exist in Asia? I learned a lot, so thanks a lot!

    • What an amazing comment you left for us today, Leah! First of all, we totally agree with you…Mrs. Caplin IS very WONDERful! We appreciate all the awesome ways she helps you and your classmates learn by exploring different Wonders of the Day together! Thank you for sharing all the background knowledge you had before you explore this Wonder. We think the “MC” gang is pretty smart! Your questions about Native Americans are awesome, too! We’ll have to do a bit more WONDERing to find the answers to them! :-)

  20. Wow! Thanks to this wonder, I know a lot more about Native Americans. It was very cool to learn information about their tribes, such as what they hunted and how they lived. One of the most interesting facts I saw was that there are about 2 million Native Americans in the United States. I also loved the video. That man was so fun to watch! Great Wonder!

    • The hoop dancer in the video WAS fun to watch, we agree, Colin! He is very good at his craft! We’re glad you learned so many interesting facts by watching the video and exploring the rest of this Wonder about Native Americans! We think it was neat to learn how the different tribes hunted and lived, too! :-)

  21. Hi, this is Jillian from Mrs. Caplin’s class! I really enjoyed this wonder, and I thought it was very informational and interesting. I knew there was some sort of Native American Heritage Month, but I never realized it was during the month of November. I also saw, as I was reading, that you used the word indigenous. It hooked my attention because I was recently reading a Scholastic News, and it said that meant native. I had a wonderful time reading this wonder! Great job!

    • Thanks so much for your comment, Jillian! We think it’s so cool that you knew some things about Native Americans before you explored this Wonder! We’re also glad that you learned that Native American Heritage Month is in November! Thanks for being a GREAT Wonder Friend! :-)

  22. Hi, Wonderopolis. First of all, I love this subject and I have lots of background knowledge on Native Americans, and settlers. We are also learning about Native Americans in school. I never knew that there were more than 560 tribes. Also, In class today, when we where talking about Indians, I learned that they grew their own crops. I guess I never really thought of that. I am also reading a book about Indians which also helps me learn more about them. I loved this wonder. :)

    • We’re glad you loved this Wonder, Alex! Thanks for leaving us a super comment to let us know that! We have really enjoyed reading the comments from you and your “MC” classmates! You guys really had some good background knowledge about Native Americans before exploring this Wonder, but we’re super glad that you learned even MORE by visiting it! :-)

  23. I am sure impressed with the STRONG comments tonight. There are so many new interesting facts along with some use of excellent vocabulary. Also some really great connections with 4th grade, along with some higher level questions. I am enjoying reading how many of my students are extending their learning at home with this wonder. GREAT job MC students-can’t wait to read more later tonight and then talk about your new learning tomorrow in class.

    • We completely agree, Maria! The MC students are really rocking the comments! We can tell they thought a lot about their writing, and we LOVE that they are sharing about their personal connections and background knowledge! Keep learning, MC students! We think you are AWESOME! :-)

  24. Hi, my name is Jack from Mrs.Caplin’s class. This wonder is very interesting to me, and I love to learn about the Native American heritage. I learned that there are more than 560 tribes in the United States. I did not know that there are about 2 million tribes that live in the United States. I also learned that the Native Americans lived mostly off the land, relying on hunting and gathering wild plants. How many Indians are usually in a tribe? Keep up with the phenomenal wonders!

    • We’re not sure how many people it takes to make up a tribe, Jack, but that’s a very WONDERful question! We know that there are very small tribes and very large tribes, so we think it might depend on the tribe! Thanks for leaving us this great comment today and for letting us know you learned so many interesting new things about Native Americans! :-)

  25. Hello, Wonderopolis! This is Sara from Mrs. Caplin’s class. This wonder brought back some background knowledge to me. I know what indigenous means, native, and that Native Americans still live today. Yesterday, we read a Scholastic News, and learned about the Cherokee Nation living in Oklahoma. But I learned some pretty interesting facts reading this article, too. For instance, I knew there was once a land bridge connecting Alaska and Russia, but I had no idea it was called Beringia. I had no idea there were 2 million Native Americans still living in the US, I thought there were way less. I wonder where these native Americans live, do they have a special amount of land reserved for them? How many Native Americans live in Ohio? I hope you can answer my questions. Bye!

    • What a super comment, Sara! Your classmate, Haley, also asked how many Native Americans live in Ohio! We found a website that lists each Native American tribe in the U.S. by state. Here is a link to the website: http://www.ncsl.org/?tabid=13278. You can look up the tribe names and their states. You can then do some more WONDERing about special native lands based on each tribe. Thanks so much for asking such great questions! :-)

  26. Hi, this is Srikar from Mrs. Caplin’s class. I thought the video was really cool with the ring dancer. I also had backround knowledge that indigenous meant native. I never knew there are 560 separate tribes across the US. I also never knew that 3 million tribes stretch from the US to Canada. How many tribes live in the world all together?

    • Hello, Srikar! Thanks for sharing the awesome background knowledge you had about this Wonder of the Day®! We’re not sure how many indigenous tribes there are in the entire world, but that would make a GREAT future Wonder of the Day®! We hope you have a super day…keep WONDERing! :-)

  27. Hello, Wonderopolis. I’m Wyatt from Mrs. Caplin’s class! In social studies, we started our Indians unit. I learned a lot from this Wonder, like the Beringia and that there are about three million Indian tribes still in North America (not including Mexico). Thanks.

    • It sounds like you DID learn a LOT from exploring this Wonder, Wyatt! We’re so happy to hear that! Thank you for leaving us this awesome comment to let us know! :-)

    • Thanks for sharing that you had background knowledge about Native Americans before you explored this Wonder of the Day®, Julie! We appreciate your comment today! :-)

  28. Good morning,

    I’m tribally enrolled at Nambe Pueblo in northern New Mexico. For several years, I taught in the American Indian Studies program at the University of Illinois.

    Your readers can gain a lot of information about American Indians, and about children’s and young adult books about American Indians, by reading my site.

    Above you said we prefer to call ourselves American Indian or Indian. That is accurate if the framework is very broad. But, without question, a Native person prefers “Nambe Pueblo” or “Ojibwe” or “Dine” or “Cherokee” to American Indian or Indian.

    • Thank you so much for sharing your personal knowledge with us, Debbie! We really appreciate you adding something extra WONDERful to this Wonder of the Day® with your AWESOME comment! It’s GREAT to learn new things and we love it when our Wonder Friends share their own experiences…it makes WONDERing even more WONDERful for us all! We hope you have a GREAT day! :-)

  29. There are more than 2 million Native American Indians in the United States of America, more than 150 languages and more than 560 tribes. Federally recognized Indians are not the only Indian people in the U.S. Many Indian tribes and languages have been almost obliterated, but not entirely. Those of us who remain and are not recognized by the federal governemnt or by a state governemnt usually find most histories and public websites sadly misinformed about our population and existence. Perhaps one day with enough education and compassion this will change. Biwa…huk mi Yesa, Oho!

    • Hi there, Scott C! We are so appreciative of your comment about our Native American Wonder. We love learning new things about cultures and groups outside of our own. It’s very important to treat everyone with respect and kindness, so we’re happy that you provided such great information to share!

      We Wonder if you can tell us what your last sentence means… what language is it? Thanks for being a great Wonder Friend, Scott C! :)

    • Thank you for telling us how much you enjoyed our Native American Wonder, John! We’re so glad that this Wonder is related to what you and your Wonder classmates are studying! We’re glad to hear it! Hope to see you soon, Wonder Friend! :)

  30. Dear worderopolis,

    Hi, me and my class have been studying about Native Americans. But I bet you that nobody in our class has seen what I have just seen, it’s just…
    amazing!

    • We’re so happy that you and your Wonder classmates have been studying the Native American culture, Blayne! It’s great to hear that this Wonder helped you to see things you’ve never studied before; we can feel the excitement all the way from your classroom to Wonderopolis! :)

    • Thanks for sharing your comment, Zach! We’re glad you told us about your favorite part of our Native American Wonder! It’s so awesome that you learned something new today! We’ll see you soon! :)

    • Thanks for sharing your comment about our Native American Wonder, Maddy! We Wonder if you and your family celebrate any traditions? :)

  31. Basically, being “Native” means one has a blood quantum that confirms a governmental standard of DNA already established. However, many African Americans choose their “race” and it’s OK. Why? Is it OK to choose? Perhaps it has something to do with some dominant gene that “speaks to them”? As far as being one of us, this seems to be similar. Those of more full blood often don’t not understand, but I know many light skinned folks who fit the blood quantum who care not at all about their own, and many with much more powerful outward “proof” than many with a so called “Native Pedigree”.That actually are more INVOLVED. So what does it MEAN to be one of us? Personally I believe one is “called”, or feels it in a way that is understood by the group. I would prefer to call this LOVE! If you got it , You know it! You FEEL it! It’s not a “wannabe” thing. They can’t STAND to be apart! from their People! :)

    • Thanks for sharing your WONDERful comment, Wonder Friend! We appreciate the great points you share about what it means to be understood by a group. Feeling included and a part of something makes us feel great and important inside and out, and that’s what matters! Working together is WONDERful and we’re glad you agree! :)

  32. I liked how they tell us about the things they wear, like boots in the winter. I think that the shoes that they use are warm because it is made of deer skin.

    • Hey Remi! It sounds like you learned a lot about Native Americans! What was your favorite part? Thanks for WONDERing with us! :)

    • Thanks for WONDERing with us, Michael! We are so glad you learned something new and have been thinking about what it means to be a Native American, too. :)

  33. We think it made the Native Americans feel angry that the Europeans changed the indigenous people’s name. We would be really furious if someone changed our name. It seems like segregation because some Europeans thought they could just walk in and take over.

    • Thanks for leaving such a thoughtful comment, Ms. Williams’ and Ms. Burch’s class! We think it’s awesome that you’re putting yourselves in the position of others and thinking about how it would feel to be them! :)

  34. Hi Wonderopolis,

    I have a question about Native Americans for you. Do Native Americans now a days live in real houses, or do they live their traditional ways?

    • That’s a great question, V! We did some research online and found that most Native Americans live in modern houses and apartments, just like other Americans. Traditional Native American homes like teepees are usually only used for ceremonial purposes these days. We’re so glad you’re WONDERing with us! Have a WONDERful day, V! :) :)

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Have you ever wondered…

  • What does it mean to be a Native American?
  • Where did the first Native Americans come from?
  • How many Native American tribes exist today?

Wonder Gallery

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Try It Out

We hope you enjoyed learning more about the first Americans today! Grab a friend or family member and keep exploring the following activities:

  • Do you have a tribe? Even if you’re not a Native American, your family and friends might constitute a close-knit tribe of your own. If you had to define your tribe, who would be in it? What is special about your tribe? What makes it unique? How would you describe your tribe to others?
  • If you had to name your tribe after an animal, what would you call it? For fun, check out the links below to learn the Native American words for certain animals in the languages of five different tribes. Choose an animal and a language and figure out what the Native American name would be for your tribe.
  • Up for a challenge? Learn more about the Native Americans that lived in the area you now call home. Do some Internet research to find out which tribes occupied your home area long ago. What were they like? What were they known for? What types of houses did they live in? Have fun learning more about the ancestors who once lived where you live today!

Still Wondering

Explore EDSITEment’s National Museum of the American Indian interactive exhibits to learn more about the history, arts and culture of Native Americans.

 

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